The Catholic University of America

 

COURSES OFFERED: Fall 2017

Unless otherwise noted, all classes are held at the Hall of States
444 N. Capitol, near Union Station

 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (MAIA)

CPOL 500: Introduction to International Affairs  

3.00 Credits

Designed to acquaint the student with the recent history of international affairs, principal subfields in the discipline, major theoretical and methodological debates in the study of world politics, and the importance of proposing parsimonious hypotheses in testing the theories. *Required for MAIA.

James Quirk (The Catholic University of America)
Thursday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
August 19, 2017—December 19, 2017

CPOL 513: The International Politics of Hunger and Food  

3.00 Credits

This course will examine where the United States stands in its bipartisan commitment to end hunger and poverty in the world. It will look at the institutions charged with this responsibility and will analyze why individuals should be similarly engaged. Among other questions it will explore the root causes of both global and domestic hunger and will review the policy responses likely to be most effective toward the objective of ending hunger in our time.

Daniel Silverstein
Wednesday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
August 28, 2017—December 19, 2017

CPOL 578: Environmental Politics and Policies  

3.00 Credits

This course examines the impact the concerns regarding the environment such as global warming has on the development of policies, domestic and international.

Dennis Coyle (University of California, Berkeley)
Tuesday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
August 28, 2017—December 19, 2017

CONGRESSIONAL AND PRESIDENTIAL STUDIES (CAPS)

CPOL 671: The Modern Congress - cancelled

3.00 Credits

This course examines the shaping of the present-day Congress as a representative and legislative institution. Trends in organization, procedure, personnel, and political behavior. Major reform movements. Major institutional problems of the contemporary Congress. *Required for CAPS.

Matthew Glassman 
Wednesday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
August 28, 2017—December 19, 2017

CPOL 672: Congress and the Presidency

3.00 Credits

This course examines the historical relationship between the congressional and executive branches. Particular attention to constitutional separation of powers and their execution in an era of heightened partisanship.

John White (University of Connecticut)
Monday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
August 29, 2017—December 19, 2017

CPOL 578: Environmental Politics and Policies  

3.00 Credits

This course examines the impact the concerns regarding the environment such as global warming has on the development of policies, domestic and international.

Dennis Coyle (University of California, Berkeley)
Tuesday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
August 28, 2017—December 19, 2017

 

COURSES OFFERED: Spring 2018

Unless otherwise noted, all classes are held at the Hall of States
444 N. Capitol, near Union Station

 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (MAIA) 

CPOL 523: Cyber Warfare

3.00 Credits

This course addresses the emerging international relations, policy, doctrine, strategy and operational issues associated with Computer Network Attack (CAN) and Computer Network Exploitation (CNE), collectively known as cyber warfare.  Students will gain an understanding of the evolution of cyber warfare and the basic characteristics and methods of CAN and CNE; the current national policies and strategies relative to cyber warfare; and the potential impact of cyber warfare on future conflicts. 

Brian Mazanec (Geroge Mason) 
Tuesday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

CPOL 548: International Politics of East Asia: China, Japan and Korea   

3.00 Credits

This course provides a broad overview of developments in East Asia, with particular emphasis on China, Japan, Korea and selected Southeast Asian nations. Examines domestic and foreign policies of these countries and assesses implications of United States policies in the region. 

Richard A. Love (New South Wales)
Monday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

CPOL 579: Iran, Iraq and the Gulf

3.00 Credits

Iran and Iraq have always been key countries in the Middle East, and American foreign policy in the region has been strongly influenced by developments in these two states. Likewise, US relations with the other countries of the Gulf region have also been strongly influenced by conditions in Iran and Iraq. To illuminate the factors that shape internal developments in these two countries, their relationships with each other, and how they fit into the broader regional context, this class will consider both recent developments and broader historic trends. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the social, political, and religious factors that have shaped these states, with particular attention to their influence on regime stability, instability and political transition. The course will also address contemporary issues such as constitutional reform, sectarianism/factionalism, cross border influences, the use of external proxies, military competition, and the influence of external powers on Iran, Iraq and the broader Gulf. 

Eric Thompson (UVA)
Wednesday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

 

CPOL 594: Independent Study 

3.00 Credits

 

January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

 

CPOL 595C: Washington Internship 

3.00 Credits

 

January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

 

CPOL 694: Independent Study: Master's Thesis 

3.00 Credits

 

January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

CONGRESSIONAL AND PRESIDENTIAL STUDIES (CAPS) 

CPOL 531: The Congressional Budget Process 

3.00 Credits

The procedure and politics of the budgetary and appropriations processes in the Congress are explored. Additionally, the relationship to public policy and electoral politics, and the roles of congressional committees, leadership, and staff are examined. . 

James Wallner (CUA)
Wednesday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

CPOL 626: The Modern Presidency

3.00 Credits

This course examines the institutional and political developments that have helped shape the modern presidency. In particular, the course examines the shifts in the nomination process and electoral landscape that have influenced the policies pursued by presidents, the development of and enlarged presidential bureaucracy (including an expanded Cabinet and Executive Office of the President), the making of domestic and foreign policy, the relationship between the president, Congress, and Supreme Court, and how these transformations have intertwined to reconfigure the presidency in the twenty-first century.

John White (University of Connecticut)
Monday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

 

CPOL 675: Interest Groups 

3.00 Credits

This course explores the nature and structure of interest groups and associations. Included in this in-depth examination are the resources and techniques of lobbies and lobbyists, the regulation of lobbying, as well as the perspective of the members of Congress. 

Diana C. Rich (Gerogetown University) 
Thursday, 6:40—9:10 p.m.
January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

 

CPOL 594: Independent Study 

3.00 Credits

January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

 

CPOL 595A: Congressional Internship

3.00 Credits

January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018

 

CPOL 694: Independent Study: Master's Thesis 

3.00 Credits

January 8, 2018 - May 5, 2018